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August 21, 2016

A stroke can sometimes cause temporary or permanent disabilities, depending on how long the brain lacks blood flow and which part was affected. Complications may include:

  • Paralysis or loss of muscle movement. You may become paralyzed on one side of your body, or lose control of certain muscles, such as those on one side of your face or one arm. Physical therapy may help you return to activities hampered by paralysis, such as walking, eating and dressing.

  • Difficulty talking or swallowing. A stroke may cause you to have less control over the way the muscles in your mouth and throat move, making it difficult for you to talk clearly (dysarthria), swallow or eat (dysphagia). You also may have difficulty with language (aphasia), including speaking or understanding speech, reading or writing. Therapy with a speech and language pathologist may help.

  • Memory loss or thinking difficulties. Many people who have had strokes experience some memory loss. Others may have difficulty thinki...

Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) come and go. Its also called a "Mild Stroke" a brief period of symptoms similar to those you'd have in a stroke. A temporary decrease in blood supply to part of your brain causes TIAs, which often last less than five minutes.  Like an ischemic stroke, a TIA occurs when a clot or debris blocks blood flow to part of your brain. A TIA doesn't leave lasting symptoms because the blockage is temporary. But a TIA should not be ignored because it significantly increases the risk for having a stroke in the future.

Symptoms of ischemic strokes and TIAs include sudden weakness in the face, arm or leg; sudden face, arm or leg numbness; sudden difficulty speaking or understanding others; or sudden difficulty seeing or walking.

It's critically important that these symptoms never be ignored. They require immediate emergency medical care. That's true even if they go away, as in a TIA. If these symptoms lead to a full stroke, immediate treatment can prevent long-...

August 19, 2016

Thunderclap headache is a sudden, severe headaches peaks within 60 seconds and can start fading after an hour. Some thunderclap headaches, however, can last for more than a week. Thunderclap headaches are often a warning sign of potentially life-threatening conditions, usually linked to bleeding in and around the brain. That's why it's so important to seek emergency medical attention if you experience a thunderclap headache.

Some people may also experience thunderclap headaches as part of a potentially recurring headache disorder, known as primary thunderclap headache. But this diagnosis should only be made after a thorough medical evaluation and elimination of other possible underlying causes.

Thunderclap headaches are dramatic. Symptoms include pain that:

  • Strikes suddenly and severely — sometimes described as the worst headache ever experienced

  • Peaks within 60 seconds

  • Lasts anywhere between an hour and 10 days

  • Can occur anywhere in the head, and may involve the neck o...

August 13, 2016

Living with migraines can be a difficult challenge. Almost one-third of migraine sufferers experience moderate to severe disability. The head pain and other migraine symptoms make it difficult for many to function during attacks. Migraines are a leading cause of disability around the globe. Despite that, half of those with migraines aren’t under a doctor’s care for the condition.Migraines impact almost every facet of a sufferer’s life, and people with migraine or severe headaches are even at increased risk of suicide.

Migraine is most common among people in their mid-30s through their 40s. This means, migraine attacks are at their height when people are most involved in their careers and most active in the work force. This means attacks can impact their work schedules the most.

Migraine sufferers seek treatment that can prevent migraine attacks, make them less frequent, stop symptoms once they’ve started or at least make the migraine symptoms less severe. Just like there are different ty...

August 13, 2016

Women experience migraine differently than men. Women report episodic pain (often for a longer duration) and chronic pain more frequently than men. More severe and more frequent migraine attacks often result from changes in estrogen levels. Research has connected hormones to migraine, but not all migraines are hormonal. During childhood, migraine is more prevalent in boys than in girls. But after puberty, when estrogen influence begins, the prevalence rises in girls. Girls are more likely to have their first migraine during the year their periods begin than at any other time in their lives. After puberty, migraine in women increases until age 40 or so, when it begins to decrease.

Women suffer from migraine three times as often as men. In the U.S., 18% of women suffer compared to 6% of men. Of those who suffer, 50% have more than 1 attack each month, and 25% have 4 or more severe attacks per month. 92% of women with severe migraine are disabled. The hormones estrogen (ES-truh-jen) a...

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Medical Affiliations:

Manila Doctors Hospital

Cardinal Santos Medical Center

Chinese General Hospital

winnielimkhoo@gmail.com

+63 (998) 5500497

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© 2015 by Winnie Lim Khoo MD. Proudly Philippine Made