Blog

The key to control your High Blood Pressure

 

High blood pressure is the single most important risk factory of stroke. It causes about 50% of ischemic strokes and also increases the risk of hemorrhagic strokes. High Blood Pressure is actually a very common condition in which the long-term force of the blood against your artery walls is high enough that it may eventually cause health problems, such as heart disease and stroke. You can have high blood pressure (hypertension) for years without any symptoms. Even without symptoms, damage to blood vessels and your heart continues and can be detected. Uncontrolled high blood pressure increases your risk of serious health problems, including heart attack and stroke.

 

Knowledge and understanding is key to controlling high blood pressure. Most people with high blood pressure have no signs or symptoms, even if blood pressure readings reach dangerously high levels. In some cases; high blood pressure may have headaches, shortness of breath or nosebleeds, but these signs and symptoms aren't specific and usually don't occur until high blood pressure has reached a severe or life-threatening stage.

A blood pressure reading, given in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg), has two numbers. The first, or upper, number measures the pressure in your arteries when your heart beats (systolic pressure). The second, or lower, number measures the pressure in your arteries between beats (diastolic pressure).

Blood pressure measurements fall into four general categories:

  • Normal blood pressure. Your blood pressure is normal if it's below 120/80 mm Hg.

  • Prehypertension. Prehypertension is a systolic pressure ranging from 120 to 139 mm Hg or a diastolic pressure ranging from 80 to 89 mm Hg. Prehypertension tends to get worse over time.

  • Stage 1 hypertension. Stage 1 hypertension is a systolic pressure ranging from 140 to 159 mm Hg or a diastolic pressure ranging from 90 to 99 mm Hg.

  • Stage 2 hypertension. More severe hypertension, stage 2 hypertension is a systolic pressure of 160 mm Hg or higher or a diastolic pressure of 100 mm Hg or higher.

High blood pressure has many risk factors, including:

  • Age. The risk of high blood pressure increases as you age. Through early middle age, or about age 45, high blood pressure is more common in men. Women are more likely to develop high blood pressure after age 65.

  • Family history. High blood pressure tends to run in families.

  • Overweight. The more you weigh the more blood you need to supply oxygen and nutrients to your tissues. As the volume of blood circulated through your blood vessels increases, so does the pressure on your artery walls.

  • Not being physically active. People who are inactive tend to have higher heart rates. The higher your heart rate, the harder your heart must work with each contraction and the stronger the force on your arteries. Lack of physical activity also increases the risk of being overweight.

  • Alcohol Drinking. Over time, heavy drinking can damage your heart. Having more than two drinks a day for men and more than one drink a day for women may affect your blood pressure.

  • Smoking. Not only does smoking or chewing tobacco immediately raise your blood pressure temporarily, but the chemicals in tobacco can damage the lining of your artery walls. 

Uncontrolled high blood pressure can lead to:

  • Heart attack or stroke. High blood pressure can cause hardening and thickening of the arteries (atherosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack, stroke or other complications.

  • Aneurysm. Increased blood pressure can cause your blood vessels to weaken and bulge, forming an aneurysm. If an aneurysm ruptures, it can be life-threatening.

  • Heart failure. To pump blood against the higher pressure in your vessels, your heart muscle thickens. Eventually, the thickened muscle may have a hard time pumping enough blood to meet your body's needs, which can lead to heart failure.

Ideally physicians recommend a blood pressure reading at least every year starting at age 18. If you're age 40 or older with a high risk of high blood pressure, ask your doctor for a blood pressure reading periodically within the year.  If you think you may have high blood pressure, make an appointment with your family doctor or health care provider to have your blood pressure checked. No special preparations are necessary to have your blood pressure checked. #hypertension #highbloodpressure #bloodpressure #bp #overweight #history #stroke #heartattack #aneurysm #heartfailure #riskfactor #specialist #winnielimkhoo #neurologist #familydoctor #doctor #strokespecialist #manila #philippines #health #advise #tips #help

Tags:

Please reload

Featured Posts

Understanding Why you should Sleep

May 25, 2019

1/10
Please reload

Archive